Cancer survivor virtually cycles to London to raise money for Rainbow Trust

Stockport teenager and cancer survivor Adam Finch, has set himself a massive challenge while in isolation by cycling on his exercise bike virtually over 200 miles to London, to raise £1,500 for us.

Adam,13, whose vulnerable heath following treatment for brain and spinal cancer means he is in isolation, can’t see his dad who lives in London. To feel closer to his dad Adam has decided to take on the huge challenge of virtually cycling to London while raising money for us, as we have supported him and his family since he was diagnosed with cancer in 2015 when he was just 8 years old.

Adam felt compelled to help us after he heard that the coronavirus had meant that we needed to cancel or postpone fundraising up and down the country. Worried that we might not be able to continue supporting families with a seriously ill child, he wanted to do something to help.

Adam says:

“In 2015 doctors told me I had a brain tumour. I was very scared, and so was my sister. But then I met Sean from Rainbow Trust, and things started to get better.
“I was in hospital for nearly a year and Sean visited me every week. He also helped Megan by seeing her and taking her to meet other brothers and sisters in similar situations. When I came out of hospital he still visited and helped us for a very long time. Because of my cancer treatment I can still get very poorly and have complications. This means I am stuck inside for 12 weeks and I cannot see my dad – as he lives in London and someone in his office was poorly. My mum keeps trying to make me happy and busy and suggested I ride to London on my exercise bike to meet my dad.
“I have also been worried about Rainbow Trust as they have to cancel their fundraising events and I want them to be there for other children as they were there for me. So we decided to make money for them with exercise.”

Adam’s mum Clare Finch says:

“Adam knows how much help Rainbow Trust has been to us as a family and when he heard the charity may be at risk he wanted to help. Illnesses such as cancer are devastating, not only to the child and immediate family but also extended family and friends. The work that our Rainbow Trust Family Support Worker provided us and the support he gave our family, allowed us all the space to breathe. It improved the health and well-being of the whole family, it lifted my constant worry and gave my daughter Megan an outlet to talk about her worries.
“I couldn’t be prouder of Adam. It’s a brilliant way for him to stay focussed during his isolation with this huge physical challenge, feel close to his dad and raise awareness and funds for an incredible charity.”

Adam is asking the public to follow his journey on Instagram at @be.more.adam, explore the country with him and tell him all about the places he will virtually visit every day.

Oonagh Goodman, Director of Fundraising and Marketing at Rainbow Trust, says:

“We are incredible grateful that Adam is taking on such a fantastic cycling challenge to help us fund our vital support to families with a seriously ill child. Rainbow trust does not receive government funding and is reliant on the generosity of the public. With the advent of corona virus it has left us very vulnerable as we struggle to raise funds. Adam’s efforts are so important to us as a charity and we can’t thank him enough for helping us at this very difficult time and we are so proud that he is thinking of us when he is in isolation.”

To sponsor Adam, please visit his fundraising page.

When a child suffers from serious illness, time becomes more precious than ever. We help by pairing each family with a specialist Family Support Worker who gives them time: Time for a parent to have a desperately needed break; time for the brothers and sisters to help them feel less frightened and isolated; and time for parents to do the things they used to love, before family life was turned upside down. Every hour of our support helps families to cope. Now, more than ever, they need our support.

Tags: